THE ALAMO and the Critics

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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby NefariousNed on Wed Feb 11, 2015 7:12 am

The Nov. 7, 1960 Time Magazine review of THE ALAMO as it appeared in the magazine.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Seguin on Wed Feb 11, 2015 8:08 am

That´s some review! :o

"Worse yet is the phony backwoodsiness of much of the dialogue ("Yuh don´t get lard less´n yuh boil the hawg") and worst of all is the teary sentiment that blears every other frame of the film and wallows to a climax of blubbering bathos when a little girl, as the carnage at the Alamo concludes, turns to her mother and piteously inquires: "Mummy, where´s daddy?"

On John Wayne: "Nature clearly did not intend this man to be a director." :shock:
Recuerden El Alamo!
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby romanorifle on Sat Feb 14, 2015 2:22 am

I deal with critics in my business all the time. They are just jealous people. They couldn't make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich let alone a movie, or in my case a custom firearm. Most of them couldn't get a job in the circus bitin' the heads off of chickens. At least whenever I have the chance, that's what I tell them. Larry
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby MUSTANG on Wed Jun 01, 2016 2:23 am

Good evening to all.

Some of you may be aware of The National Film Registry. Each year, twenty-five films are selected, usually in December, to be included in the registry. According to the guidelines, the registry " is a list of films deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" that are earmarked for preservation by the Library of Congress. These films are not selected as the 'best' American films of all time, but rather as works of enduring importance to American culture. They reflect who we are as a people and as a nation." While films honored are selected by the Library of Congress, nominations can come from anywhere, including individuals such as ourselves. Perhaps by being selected to this prestigious list, a film that we all know and love may stand a better chance of being preserved.

If, for whatever reason, you feel as I that John Wayne's 'The Alamo" is culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" please take a moment to file your nomination. It's easy and takes just a minute of your time. If enough of us file a nomination, perhaps the powers that be will recognize it's importance. Just Google "National Film Registry" and follow the nomination instructions.

Thanks, John
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby MUSTANG on Wed Jun 01, 2016 2:56 am

By the way, "The Searchers," Red River,' "Rio Bravo," "Stagecoach," The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance," "The Quiet Man," and "The Big Trail" have already been included. For those Alamophiles, "The Last Command" was added in 2006.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby SantaClaus on Wed Jun 01, 2016 4:27 am

Thanks for the hot tip, John. I have just submitted my nomination for The Alamo. Hip Hip Hooray! :D
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby NefariousNed on Wed Jun 01, 2016 5:10 am

Done! It was simple. Will take you less than a minute.

Here's the direct link: http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2 ... =aAQHHh7q_
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Wed Jun 01, 2016 5:42 am

I done did it, dude.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby SantaClaus on Wed Jun 01, 2016 1:47 pm

I wish there was a way to nominate Rich Curilla as "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" so that he too could be earmarked for preservation by the Library of Congress.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby MUSTANG on Wed Jun 01, 2016 2:53 pm

Thanks for everyone's support. I'm getting a ton of e-mails for "Alamo" nominations. Aissa even replied. We're getting a great deal of traction!!!!!
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Wed Jun 01, 2016 3:42 pm

SantaClaus wrote:I wish there was a way to nominate Rich Curilla as "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" so that he too could be earmarked for preservation by the Library of Congress.
Richard McClory

LOL. Nah! I don't like the smell of VitaFilm.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Wed Jun 01, 2016 3:43 pm

MUSTANG wrote:Thanks for everyone's support. I'm getting a ton of e-mails for "Alamo" nominations. Aissa even replied. We're getting a great deal of traction!!!!!

Ain't nobody else could do this! ;)
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Fargo Fenwyck on Wed Jun 01, 2016 9:19 pm

So does that mean a possible restoration?????
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Wed Jun 01, 2016 9:35 pm

Fargo Fenwyck wrote:So does that mean a possible restoration?????

Fargo, it doesn't mean anything but that the film will get recognition -- if they list it. What happens after that is a wild guess.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Rob on Wed Jun 01, 2016 9:43 pm

MUSTANG wrote:Thanks for everyone's support. I'm getting a ton of e-mails for "Alamo" nominations. Aissa even replied. We're getting a great deal of traction!!!!!

Keep it up! Just added my nomination. Couldn't be easier! If you have a minute, and believe as we do, then please check it out!
This is it, Crockett, they've breached the North Wall, we gotta'...
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby TexianAtHeartII on Thu Jun 02, 2016 12:56 am

Got 'er done.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby MUSTANG on Thu Jun 02, 2016 3:32 am

Just a quick update.

First, I'd like to thank everyone who has sent in a nomination so far. I've received dozens and dozens of confirmations, not only on this website but also through Facebook. I hope the eventual sheer magnitude of submissions will convince the powers that be to honor this worthy film.

Second, it doesn't hurt to get the word out. So, if any of you have Facebook pages or other means to share notice of this activity, please don't hesitate to do so.

And finally. I've contacted as many sources as I can think of to help promote this campaign. I've been in contact with "True West," Wild West," "Western Clippings," "Cowboys & Indians, "American Cowboy," "Cinema Retro," "The Alamo Journal," and "The San Antonio News-Express," along with other magazines and websites to see if they'll advertise and support this nomination. I also plan to contact the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in OKC as well as the John Wayne Birthplace Museum to get engaged. Tonight, I've contacted Wayne Enterprises. At the moment, I don't have any current contact information for Batjac but I'm working on it. In addition, through folks such as Aissa Wayne and Dean Smith, we hope to spread the word in the film industry. And by sharing on Facebook, the word is getting around. If this doesn't bear fruit it won't be for lack of trying.

If anyone has any additional thoughts, please don't hesitate to share them with me. And, thanks again for all your involvement.

John
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Pudman on Thu Jun 02, 2016 4:34 pm

Crossed this line. Thanks for the info. Maybe this will help to restore long version Blu-ray. At least I have the laserdisc.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Doc on Thu Jun 02, 2016 7:15 pm

Done. I'd like to remind some fellow fans that MGM did broadcast a "restored" version on their MGMHD channel. It was the short version and had serious audio problems but the color and clarity were seriously improved.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:33 pm

Wish someone in my neighborhood got that. :(
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Fargo Fenwyck on Fri Jun 03, 2016 4:50 pm

Kinda thought so.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Sun Jun 05, 2016 3:11 pm

Turner is rerunning THE ALAMO on TCM, on Tuesday, July 12, at 2:00 PM. It is the director's cut. Here's the link to the listing with Leonard Maltin's review.

http://www.tcm.com/schedule/search/?typ ... =the+alamo
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby AlamoAaron on Wed Jun 08, 2016 5:57 pm

garyzaboly wrote:
Davy wrote:So true but who cares! :lol: It will always be my fave I think ... critics be damned! :twisted:

Davy


I hear you Davy, but the criticism is also part of the story of the film. Here, for instance, is what TIME Magazine had to say in its November 7, 1960 issue:

"The Alamo (Batjac; United Artists), which is the first picture ever directed by Hollywood He-Man John Wayne, is also the biggest western ever made. Wayne & Co. have not quite managed to make it the worst. Shot in Todd-AO and exposed on color film that is practically fluorescent, the movie was produced on location in a $1,500,000 replica of the Alamo and the village around it, employs 1,500 horses and seven instantly recognizable human beings (Wayne, Richard Widmark, Laurence Harvey, Richard Boone, Frankie Avalon, Linda Cristal, Chill Wills). Released as a reserved-seat feature ($1.50-$3.50), it is said to have cost $12 million. Predicts one shrewd old Hollywood range rider, Director John (Stagecoach) Ford: "It will run forever.''

"In the case of The Alamo, forever is almost attained in one projection; the film runs three hours and 38 minutes, including an intermission. The first three hours, moreover, are as flat as Texas. Plenty happens: a seduction, an orgy, a murder, a battle royal in a barroom. But it all seems to have happened before, in some other John Wayne western, and in any case most of the action has nothing to do with the Alamo.

"When the film finally does get down to historical cases, it proves to be shamelessly inaccurate. Two leading characters. Colonel William B. Travis (Laurence Harvey) and Jim Bowie (Richard Widmark), are respectively nastified and sissified almost out of recognition for theatrical effect. The Mexican army, apparently in deference to the large Mexican movie market, is presented as a body of sensitive young men who look as though they all have college degrees and suffer every time they pull a trigger. And at one point, just in case the teen-agers don't dig all that ancient history. Singer Avalon jumps up and belts out a little rock 'n' roll.

"Worse yet is the phony backwoodsiness of much of the dialogue ("Yuh doan git lard less'n yuh boil the hawg"), and worst of all is the teary sentiment that blears every other frame of the film and wallows to a climax of blubbering bathos when a little girl, as the carnage at the Alamo concludes, turns to her mother and piteously inquires: "Mummy, where's Daddy?"

In so much movie there are bound to be a couple of good things. The gorgeously gory fracas at the finish is one of them, and John Wayne is the other. Nature clearly did not intend this man to be a director. But as Davy Crockett he demonstrates once again his superiority over the rest of Hollywood's strong, silent types in portraying the unaccommodated man—the natural ignobleman invested with the authority of size and the dignity of slow wits."


Actually, whoever wrote this review, was quite correct....
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby SantaClaus on Wed Jun 08, 2016 11:38 pm

Whether it be news or a movie review, I wouldn't take Time Magazine's word the night was dark or day is light. The critic complains that the film is historically inaccurate. The critic's description is also inaccurate. "...have not quite managed to make it the worst (western ever made)", he says. Maybe he didn't like it, but I've seen westerns that rank far below The Alamo in every way, with budgets large and small.
He says the first 3 hours are "as flat as Texas". Texas may seem flat on a map, but here in Austin, on the edge of the Hill Country, I'd say that the critic should pull his head out of his Atlas and take a look at the real world.
He says that he saw a "seduction". I saw a romance. He saw an "orgy". I saw men drinking and dancing. They got drunk.
He saw a murder. Nobody was murdered. (In the film)
"A battle royal in a barroom" :?: Did this guy see the same movie I saw?
"...exposed on color film that is practically fluorescent.." This critic needs to get out of the theater and into the sun once in while. There was something wrong with his eyes. Maybe he'd been up all night at one of those orgies.
Bowie was "sissified"? I can think of many ways to describe Widmark's Bowie, but "sissified" is not one of them.
"The Mexican army, apparently in deference to the large Mexican movie market, is presented as a body of sensitive young men who look as though they all have college degrees and suffer every time they pull a trigger." Where do those ideas come from?
"...just in case the teen-agers don't dig all that ancient history. Singer Avalon jumps up and belts out a little rock 'n' roll." That must have been when he sang "You ain't nothin' but a Bee Keeper." Even the way Avalon "belted it out", I don't think "Here's to the Ladies" is rock 'n' roll, "little" or otherwise.
"...phony backwoodsiness of much of the dialogue ("Yuh doan git lard less'n yuh boil the hawg")..." Critiquing the dialogue is fair, but that's not how the line was delivered by John Wayne. He said "You don't get lard less'n you boil the hog." Why write "hawg"? Maybe the critic was from a part of the country where they speak the King's English. I pronounce it hawg.
It wasn't "Mummy, where's Daddy?" It's "Where's Daddy, Mommy."
Why couldn't the guy just say that the movie was too long, he was bored, he thought it was sappy, it was historically inaccurate, he thinks John Wayne did a lousy job directing, and whatever else, without resorting to making up stuff, pulling it out of his ear, and then putting it on paper?
His last line tells more of the critic's personal animosity toward Wayne, rather than of the critic's artistic eye for film, "But as Davy Crockett he demonstrates once again his superiority over the rest of Hollywood's strong, silent types in portraying the unaccommodated man—the natural ignobleman invested with the authority of size and the dignity of slow wits."
I still watch John Wayne's "The Alamo" again and again. I haven't read Time magazine for decades. I have over 30 back pages to read on the diorama thread. Has anyone spent time in their workshops building models of Time magazine?
Richard McClory
p.s. When Wayne/Crockett throws his torch at the powder kegs, the sign on the door should read "TIME MAGAZINE". :lol:
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Thu Jun 09, 2016 12:08 am

That's why I like Leonard Maltin. He won't stoop to crap like that. He'll say what he likes and what he doesn't like about a movie -- directly and succinctly. He doesn't try to turn people away from a movie. He just says, "If you know my reviews and agree or disagree with them mostly, then you know whether you can depend on this to be like your view might be, or unlike it." Here is Leonard Maltin's review:

THE ALAMO
D: John Wayne. John Wayne, Richard Widmark, Laurence Harvey, Richard Boone, Carlos Arruza, Frankie Avalon, Pat Wayne, Linda Cristal, Chill Wills, Ken Curtis, Hank Worden, Denver Pyle, Olive Carey, Veda Ann Borg, John Dierkes, Guinn "Big Boy" Williams. Long, and long-winded, saga of the Alamo, with plenty of historical name-dropping and speechifying. Worthwhile for final attack, a truly memorable movie spectacle. Fine score by Dimitri Tiomkin includes popular "The Green Leaves of Summer." Filmed on location in Brackettville, Texas. Cut by 26m. after its L.A. premiere; restored for 1992 tape and laser reissues. Todd-AO.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby SantaClaus on Thu Jun 09, 2016 12:33 am

"He won't stoop to crap like that."
Rich, That's quite a picturesque choice of words. ;)
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Thu Jun 09, 2016 12:51 am

I think the term "film critic" says it all. The Time guy was a "critic" who keeps selling publications by "criticizing" films. Leonard Maltin writes "reviews" with the opinion of a film scholar. And, in spite of the fact that many film "scholars" of the time looked down their noses on the film, Maltin treated it honestly -- and from the heart. He also liked The Alamo (2004). When I spoke with him briefly on Alamo Plaza during the premiere party, he said he really liked it but that it would not be successful at the box office. He knew immediately how he felt and what the reality would be.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Jun 09, 2016 2:25 am

And how was THE ALAMO a "Western", exactly? It takes place in Texas, ergo, it's a "Western". I guess that would make "Bonnie And Clyde" a "Western"
as well, or "The Last Picture Show".
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Thu Jun 09, 2016 3:27 am

That's always annoyed me too -- more with JLH's Alamo than with John Wayne's. Wayne's WAS a western in many ways, not the least of which was Wayne himself as star. But JLH's was clearly not a western and yet it still got categorized as one. My analogy is that it the Alamo story is a western, then what is Gettysburg? And The Patriot? As much as The Last Command was literally a Republic Western, it at least was labeled as a "Historical Drama" in listings, which all Alamo movies should be.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Fargo Fenwyck on Fri Jun 10, 2016 2:01 pm

If Wayne only directed it, I wonder what would have been said. If Wayne had Ford's direction, again I wonder. That being said it was a bad year for OCSARS. Really "The Apartment"???? No nod for "Spartacus". It was the 60's. Hollywood was in love with itself and the so called 'message' pictures.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:33 pm

And The Alamo wasn't a "message picture????" :?
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby RLC-GTT on Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:34 pm

And Never On Sunday won for Best Song over The Green Leaves of Summer!!!!! :roll:
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby gtj222 on Fri Jun 10, 2016 9:06 pm

Actually Spartacus won 4 academy awards. I really don't have a problem with the apartment winning best picture. I think it is a very good movie.
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby BexarTom on Sat Jun 11, 2016 5:54 am

Maybe I'm late with this, but, speaking of "Spartacus", did anyone see "Trumbo"?
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Buckshot on Sat Jun 11, 2016 10:03 pm

RLC-GTT wrote:And Never On Sunday won for Best Song over The Green Leaves of Summer!!!!! :roll:


I liked Melina Mercouri, but I like The Green Leaves of Summer" a whole lot better.....
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby AlamoAaron on Sun Jun 12, 2016 1:24 am

SantaClaus wrote:Whether it be news or a movie review, I wouldn't take Time Magazine's word the night was dark or day is light. The critic complains that the film is historically inaccurate. The critic's description is also inaccurate. "...have not quite managed to make it the worst (western ever made)", he says. Maybe he didn't like it, but I've seen westerns that rank far below The Alamo in every way, with budgets large and small.
He says the first 3 hours are "as flat as Texas". Texas may seem flat on a map, but here in Austin, on the edge of the Hill Country, I'd say that the critic should pull his head out of his Atlas and take a look at the real world.
He says that he saw a "seduction". I saw a romance. He saw an "orgy". I saw men drinking and dancing. They got drunk.
He saw a murder. Nobody was murdered. (In the film)
"A battle royal in a barroom" :?: Did this guy see the same movie I saw?
"...exposed on color film that is practically fluorescent.." This critic needs to get out of the theater and into the sun once in while. There was something wrong with his eyes. Maybe he'd been up all night at one of those orgies.
Bowie was "sissified"? I can think of many ways to describe Widmark's Bowie, but "sissified" is not one of them.
"The Mexican army, apparently in deference to the large Mexican movie market, is presented as a body of sensitive young men who look as though they all have college degrees and suffer every time they pull a trigger." Where do those ideas come from?
"...just in case the teen-agers don't dig all that ancient history. Singer Avalon jumps up and belts out a little rock 'n' roll." That must have been when he sang "You ain't nothin' but a Bee Keeper." Even the way Avalon "belted it out", I don't think "Here's to the Ladies" is rock 'n' roll, "little" or otherwise.
"...phony backwoodsiness of much of the dialogue ("Yuh doan git lard less'n yuh boil the hawg")..." Critiquing the dialogue is fair, but that's not how the line was delivered by John Wayne. He said "You don't get lard less'n you boil the hog." Why write "hawg"? Maybe the critic was from a part of the country where they speak the King's English. I pronounce it hawg.
It wasn't "Mummy, where's Daddy?" It's "Where's Daddy, Mommy."
Why couldn't the guy just say that the movie was too long, he was bored, he thought it was sappy, it was historically inaccurate, he thinks John Wayne did a lousy job directing, and whatever else, without resorting to making up stuff, pulling it out of his ear, and then putting it on paper?
His last line tells more of the critic's personal animosity toward Wayne, rather than of the critic's artistic eye for film, "But as Davy Crockett he demonstrates once again his superiority over the rest of Hollywood's strong, silent types in portraying the unaccommodated man—the natural ignobleman invested with the authority of size and the dignity of slow wits."
I still watch John Wayne's "The Alamo" again and again. I haven't read Time magazine for decades. I have over 30 back pages to read on the diorama thread. Has anyone spent time in their workshops building models of Time magazine?
Richard McClory
p.s. When Wayne/Crockett throws his torch at the powder kegs, the sign on the door should read "TIME MAGAZINE". :lol:


OK, no disrespect to Duke, but I couldn't help but cracking up real good when the alternate Elvis lyric said, "You ain't nothin' but a Bee Keeper." After a day in hot humidity, this was great. :lol:
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Sharkman on Thu Oct 13, 2016 3:15 am

I am now 63 years old ,that movie when I saw it in 1960 started my interest in the Alamo. In the balcony with my Mom and Dad , a Sunday matinee it was packed . John Wayne bigger than life , the battle was outstanding I may have shed a couple of tears. But I couldn't get enough I got every book I could find on it begged my Dad until we went to Hemisphere 1968 and I got to see the Alamo I felt at home there. As I got older I looked at the film differently I watch it a few tims a year now , and I think of it as a good John Wayne movie. Not a Alamo movie but it was John By golly Wayne ! I like all the Alamo movies but it was my first. I love talking and reading about it I love hearing the story's from you who were close to the movie or were in it.
So if it sparked that kind of interest it must be a great movie , love you guys :shock: :ugeek:
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby SantaClaus on Thu Oct 13, 2016 4:52 am

Sharkman wrote:I am now 63 years old ,that movie when I saw it in 1960 started my interest in the Alamo. In the balcony with my Mom and Dad , a Sunday matinee it was packed . John Wayne bigger than life , the battle was outstanding I may have shed a couple of tears. But I couldn't get enough I got every book I could find on it begged my Dad until we went to Hemisphere 1968 and I got to see the Alamo I felt at home there. As I got older I looked at the film differently I watch it a few tims a year now , and I think of it as a good John Wayne movie. Not a Alamo movie but it was John By golly Wayne ! I like all the Alamo movies but it was my first. I love talking and reading about it I love hearing the story's from you who were close to the movie or were in it.
So if it sparked that kind of interest it must be a great movie , love you guys :shock: :ugeek:

Sharkman,
I think many of us here are on a similar timeline to yours, and John Wayne's "The Alamo" had the same kind of effect on us. I'm 65, first saw the movie in Chicago, then many times in my local suburban theaters, and again in re-release, and many times in VHS and DVD formats. Many nights, my brother and I fell asleep to a 33 1/3 record of the movie soundtrack (tears in my eyes), and there's a soundtrack CD loaded in my car's system even now. More than anything else, "The Alamo" inspired me to read and study real history. It's why I chose to go to college in Texas, The University of Dallas, and get my BA in History, though you made it to the real Alamo a year before I did. I stayed in Texas, first in the Dallas area, then here to Austin in 1982.
A few years ago, I had the privilege of attending an after-hours screening of "The Alamo" at the Bob Bullock Museum of Texas History, and there were a couple of speakers giving presentations before the movie started, one of them being Brian Huberman, the man who made the documentary that was included with the Laser Disc, then with the DVD in an abbreviated version. Professor Huberman, who perhaps is usually a friendly guy, was rubbing the audience the wrong way by punctuating the flaws of the film which everyone had come to see, and around where I was sitting, the atmosphere was getting a bit tense. Finally, Dean Smith broke the silence with a frustrated and sincere, "Well, I thought it was a great movie!" in contradiction to what the speaker had been saying. Al least that's the way I remember that evening.
To me, John Wayne's "The Alamo" was and is a great movie. I'm not speaking as a professional critic, paid reviewer, historian, or professor of movie making. I'm speaking about Richard McClory's idea of what makes a movie so great that it can move me emotionally and physically, always be spellbinding, and be something I'll always "Remember", just like the movie poster says. :)
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Re: THE ALAMO and the Critics

Postby Sharkman on Thu Oct 13, 2016 10:28 am

Amen brother. I can count on two fingers the movies the critics liked and I did too.! Thank you for letting me know I am not the only one
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Re: The Alamo and the Critics

Postby MUSTANG on Wed Dec 14, 2016 3:38 pm

MUSTANG wrote:Just a quick update.

First, I'd like to thank everyone who has sent in a nomination so far. I've received dozens and dozens of confirmations, not only on this website but also through Facebook. I hope the eventual sheer magnitude of submissions will convince the powers that be to honor this worthy film.

Second, it doesn't hurt to get the word out. So, if any of you have Facebook pages or other means to share notice of this activity, please don't hesitate to do so.

And finally. I've contacted as many sources as I can think of to help promote this campaign. I've been in contact with "True West," Wild West," "Western Clippings," "Cowboys & Indians, "American Cowboy," "Cinema Retro," "The Alamo Journal," and "The San Antonio News-Express," along with other magazines and websites to see if they'll advertise and support this nomination. I also plan to contact the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in OKC as well as the John Wayne Birthplace Museum to get engaged. Tonight, I've contacted Wayne Enterprises. At the moment, I don't have any current contact information for Batjac but I'm working on it. In addition, through folks such as Aissa Wayne and Dean Smith, we hope to spread the word in the film industry. And by sharing on Facebook, the word is getting around. If this doesn't bear fruit it won't be for lack of trying.

If anyone has any additional thoughts, please don't hesitate to share them with me. And, thanks again for all your involvement.

John

The National Film Registry announced their selections today and, despite a vigorous campaign, Duke's "The Alamo" was not included. They did selection many great films including "The Birds," "Blackboard Jungle," 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea,", etc. Check out their website for the full list. Thanks to everyone who nominated the film. But, we can't give up. Films can be nominated each year until they are included so let's vote early and often. Maybe 2017 will be the year they recognize Wayne's film.
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